SuperMoon II

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  • The largest full moon of 2013, a so-called “supermoon,” will light up the night sky this weekend, but there’s more to this lunar delight than meets the eye. On Sunday, June 23, at 7 a.m. EDT, the moon will arrive at perigee — the point in its orbit its orbit bringing it closest to Earth), a distance of 221,824 miles. Now the moon typically reaches perigee once each month (and on some occasions twice), with their respective distances to Earth varying by 3 percent. But Sunday’s lunar perigee will be the moon’s closest to Earth of 2013. And 32 minutes later, the moon will officially turn full. The close timing of the moon’s perigee and its full phase are what will bring about the biggest full moon of the year, a celestial event popularly defined by some as a “supermoon.” (LINK)
  • In addition, the near coincidence of Sunday’s full moon with perigee will result in a dramatically large range of high and low ocean tides. The highest tides will not, however, coincide with the perigee moon but will actually lag by up to a couple of days depending on the specific coastal location. (LINK)
  • On June 20, 2013, at 11:24 p.m., the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME, a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later. These particles cannot travel through the atmosphere to harm humans on Earth, but they can affect electronic systems in satellites and on the ground. Experimental NASA research models, based on observations from NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and ESA/NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory show that the CME left the sun at speeds of around 1350 miles per second, which is a fast speed for CMEs. (LINK)

aNNa’S NoTe:  Full moons mean crazy kids, higher levels of stress, greater numbers of births, and big earthquakes.  CMEs that are earth directed also cause big earthquakes.  Big earthquake causing full moon + Big earthquake causing CME = VERY HIGH chance of big, big earthquake.  Just so’s ya know.  But on the bright side, you can go out and see the beautiful moon.  If you’re not in Michigan – we’re expecting thunderstorms.  ((grin))  Previous post about the three summer supermoons HERE.

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1 Comment

  1. It’s sad that these beautiful lappenings have such side effects.

    Reply

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