————— April 09, 2015 —————

Seudah Moshiach

((from Shirat Devorah, bolding from me))
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Acharon Shel Pesach, the last day of Pesach [this coming Shabbat] has a special connection to the coming of Moshiach and is celebrated accordingly, by partaking of Moshiach’s Seudah [the meal of Moshiach….. sometimes known as the Third Seder]

The last day of Pesach  is celebrated by eating a special, festive banquet called Moshiach’s seudah, a custom initiated by the Baal Shem Tov. The connection between the last day of Pesach and Moshiach is explained by the Tzemach Tzedek:
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“The last day of Pesach is the conclusion of that which began on the first night of Pesach. The first night of Pesach is our festival commemorating our redemption from Egypt by the Holy One, Blessed be He. It was the first redemption, carried out through Moshe Rabbeinu, who was the first redeemer; it was the beginning. The last day of Pesach is our festival commemorating the final redemption, when the Holy One, Blessed be He, will redeem us from the last exile through our righteous Moshiach, who is the final Redeemer. The first day of Pesach is Moshe Rabbeinu’s festival; the last day of Pesach is Moshiach’s festival.”
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…That Moshiach’s festival is celebrated specifically on the last day of Pesach is not merely because Moshiach will redeem us from the last exile. Being last has a significance beyond mere numerical order, for that which is last performs a unique function. When the Jews journeyed in the desert after leaving Egypt, they marched in a specific order, divided into four camps. The last to march was the camp of Dan, which is described by Torah as “ma’asaf l’chol hamachanos” – “gatherer of all the camps.” Rashi explains this as meaning that “The tribe of Dan…would journey last, and whoever would lose anything, it would be restored to him.”
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The concept of “gatherer of all the camps” – restoring lost property and making sure that nothing is missing – may be applied to various situations. …Pesach, it was noted earlier, is associated with the concept of redemption, and our service on Pesach is correspondingly directed towards hastening the arrival of the final redemption. But even if service on Pesach was deficient, if opportunities were missed, not all is lost: the last day of Pesach acts as “gatherer of all the camps” for the entire festival. Just as the tribe of Dan restored lost articles to their owners, so the last day of Pesach provides a Jew with the opportunity to rectify omissions in the service of Pesach…  Because Pesach is associated with the redemption through Moshiach and the last day of Pesach is the finish to and completion of Pesach, the last day of Pesach accordingly emphasizes the coming of Moshiach.
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…As in the journeys in the desert, there is a “gatherer of all the camps” in the generations-long journey of Jews to the Messianic Era. …For the service of Jews throughout the generations has been all but completed, and only the finishing touches – “gatherer of all the camps” – is needed. We stand ready and prepared to greet Moshiach.
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The last day of Pesach, the eighth day, is therefore the day of the circumcision, which is “the beginning of the entry of the holy soul.” Moshiach is the yechidah – the most sublime level of the soul – of the Jewish people. Until the body of Jewry has undergone circumcision it is not whole; its holy soul is missing. Moreover, the Alter Rebbe writes, the highest level of circumcision will take place in the future, when “The L-rd will circumcise your heart.”
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[Source: Sichah of the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Acharon Shel Pesach, 5742]
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aNNa’S NoTe:  SO MUCH to be said, here!!  First, the fact that there is reason to celebrate Mimouna (last day feast’s name in some circles).  It’s a feast of rejoicing, anticipating Messiah’s second coming!Second, there’s the fact that OT exodus references symbolize the same thing – it’s on the seventh day after Pesach that Israel was FINALLY completely out of bondage, as they crossed the Red Sea and Egypt was drown, and was no longer after them.

Third, did you see that reference of ‘whosoever shall lose [something] shall find it?’   Check out Matthew 16:25 – it matches perfectly.  And remember, the Jews don’t do New Testament scripture, so that they’re matching up identically is AMAZING.

And as if that weren’t enough, Passover/Unleavened/Firstfruits are a three-piece spring feast set that mirrors the three-piece fall feast set of Rosh Ha’shana/Yom Kippur/Sukkot.  In the fall, Sukkot is the biggie (where the Jews are commanded to go to Jerusalem)… it’s seven days long and ends with the Brit day of Christ (His circumcision).  The mirror image are the feasts we’ve been celebrating, right now.  Passover is the biggie (where the Jews are commanded to go to Jerusalem), it’s seven days long and ends with… what does this article say?… the circumcision of US!  So very kewl!!!

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